Tag Archives: Flash Player

Adobe Patches Flash but Delays Reader Update

Summary:

  • This vulnerability affects: Adobe Flash Player running on all platforms and Adobe Air
  • How an attacker exploits it: By enticing users to visit a website containing malicious Flash content
  • Impact: In the worst case, an attacker can execute code on the user’s computer, potentially gaining control of it
  • What to do: Download and install the latest version of Adobe Flash Player for your platform

Exposure:

Adobe Flash Player displays interactive, animated web content called Flash. Although Flash is optional, 99% of PC users download and install it to view multimedia web content. It runs on many operating systems, including mobile operating systems like Android.

In a security bulletin released this week during Patch Day, Adobe released an update that fixes a dozen security vulnerabilities affecting Flash Player running on any platform. The bulletin doesn’t describe the flaws in much technical detail, but does say most of them consist of various types of memory corruption flaws. If an attacker can entice one of your users to visit a malicious website containing specially crafted Flash content, he could exploit many of these vulnerabilities to execute code on that user’s computer, with that user’s privileges. If your Windows users have local administrator privileges, an attacker could exploit this flaw to gain full control of their PCs.

Though attackers aren’t exploiting these flaws in the wild yet, Adobe rates them as a “Priority 1” issues for Windows, Mac, and Linux users, and recommends you apply the updates within 72 hours. These vulnerabilities also affect other platforms as well, though not as severely. I recommend you update any Flash capable device as soon as you can.

As an aside, though Adobe promised a Reader update this month, they seem to have delayed it for some reason. You may want to keep an eye on Adobe’s Security page for more updates.

Solution Path

Adobe has released new versions of Flash Player to fix these issues. If you allow Adobe Flash in your network, you should download and install the new versions immediately. If you’ve enabled Flash Player’s recent “silent update” option, you will receive this update automatically.

You can download Flash for your computer at the link provided below. See the bulletin’s “Affected Software” section for more details on getting Flash updates for other platforms:

Keep in mind, if you use Google Chrome or Internet Explorer 10 or 11 you’ll have to update it separately.

For All WatchGuard Users:

If you choose, you can configure the HTTP proxy on your XTM appliance to block Flash content. Keep in mind, doing so blocks all Flash content, whether legitimate or malicious.

Our proxies offer many ways for you to block files and content, including by file extensionMIME type, or by using very specific hexidecimal patterns found in the body of a message – a technique sometimes referred to as Magic Byte detection. Below I list the various ways you can identify various Flash files:

File Extension:

  • .flv –  Adobe Flash file (file typically used on websites)
  • .fla – Flash movie file
  • .f4v – Flash video file
  • .f4p – Protected Flash video file
  • .f4a – Flash audio file
  • .f4b – Flash audiobook file

MIME types:

  • video/x-flv
  • video/mp4 (used for more than just Flash)
  • audio/mp4 (used for more than just Flash)

FILExt.com reported Magic Byte Pattern:

  • Hex FLV: 46 4C 56 01
  • ASCII FLV: FLV
  • Hex FLA:  D0 CF 11 E0 A1 B1 1A E1 00

(Keep in mind, not all the Hex and ASCII patterns shared here are appropriate for content blocking. If the pattern is too short, or not unique enough, blocking with them could result in many false positives) 

If you decide you want to block Flash files, the links below contain instructions that will help you configure your Firebox proxy’s content blocking features using the file and MIME information listed above.

Status:

Adobe has released updates to fix these Flash vulnerabilities.

References:

This alert was researched and written by Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept)

Adobe Patches Rosetta Flash Vulnerability

Summary:

  • This vulnerability affects: Adobe Flash Player  14.0.0.125 and earlier, running on all platforms (and Air)
  • How an attacker exploits it: By enticing you to run specially crafted Flash content (often delivered as a .SWF file)
  • Impact: Varies, but in one case an attacker can leverage this flaw to gain access to sensitive content from other web domains you visit.
  • What to do: Download and install the latest version of Adobe Flash Player (version 14.0.0.145 for computers)

Exposure:

Adobe Flash Player displays interactive, animated web content called Flash. Although Flash is optional, 99% of PC users download and install it to view multimedia web content. It runs on many operating systems, including mobile operating systems like Android.

In a security bulletin released this week, Adobe announced a patch that fixes three vulnerabilities in Adobe Flash Player 14.0.0.125 and earlier, running on all platforms.

Adobe characterizes two of the vulnerabilities as “security bypass” flaws, and states that attackers could exploit at least one of them to take control of the affected system. However, it’s the third vulnerability that is most interesting and is getting media attention.

A security researcher, Michele Spagnuolo, posted a blog article describing a complex, multi-layered vulnerability called the Rosetta Flash flaw, which involves both the Flash vulnerability, but also depends on JSONP-based web applications. If you’re interested in the intricate technical details of the attack, I recommend you check out the Spagnuolo’s blog post, or presentation. The scope of the vulnerability is a little easier to understand. If an attacker can trick your users into running specially crafted Flash content, he can potentially take advantage of this flaw to steal your user’s information from certain third party domains that use JSONP-based applications. When first discovered, this included domains like Ebay, Tumblr, and some Google applications However, these big companies have since modified their web applications to prevent this flaw.

In any case, Adobe rates these issues as a “Priority 1” issues for Windows and Mac, and recommends you apply the updates as soon as possible (within 72 hours).   However, the vulnerability technically affects other platforms as well, so I recommend you update any Flash capable device as soon as you can.

Solution Path

Adobe has released new versions of Flash Player (14.0.0.145 for computers) to fix these issues. If you allow Adobe Flash in your network, you should download and install the new versions immediately. If you’ve enabled Flash Player’s recent “silent update” option, you will receive this update automatically.

  • Download Flash Player for your computer:
NOTE: Chrome and newer versions of IE ship with their own versions of Flash, built-in. If you use them as you web browser, you will also have to update them separately, though both often receive their updates automatically.

For All WatchGuard Users:

If you choose, you can configure the HTTP proxy on your XTM appliance to block Flash (and Shockwave) content. Keep in mind, doing so blocks all Flash content, whether legitimate or malicious.

Finally, our Reputation Enabled Defense (RED) and WebBlocker services can often prevent your users from accidentally visiting malicious (or legitimate but booby-trapped) web sites that contain these sorts of attacks. Nonetheless, we still recommend you install Adobe’s Flash update to completely protect yourself from all of these flaws.

Status:

Adobe has released updates to fix these Flash vulnerabilities.

References:

This alert was researched and written by Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept)

Latest Flash Update Mends Code Execution and XSS Flaws

Summary:

  • This vulnerability affects: Adobe Flash Player  13.0.0.214 and earlier, running on all platforms (and Air)
  • How an attacker exploits it: By enticing users to visit a website containing malicious Flash content
  • Impact: In the worst case, an attacker can execute code on the user’s computer, potentially gaining control of it
  • What to do: Download and install the latest version of Adobe Flash Player (version 14.0.0.125 for computers)

Exposure:

Adobe Flash Player displays interactive, animated web content called Flash. Although Flash is optional, 99% of PC users download and install it to view multimedia web content. It runs on many operating systems, including mobile operating systems like Android.

In a security bulletin released today, Adobe announced a patch that fixes six critical vulnerabilities in Adobe Flash Player 13.0.0.214 and earlier, running on all platforms.

The six vulnerabilities differ technically, and in scope and impact, but one flaw stands out as the worst. Specifically, Flash Player suffers from an unspecified memory corruption vulnerability that attackers could exploit to execute arbitrary code. Adobe doesn’t share the details, but we assume if an attacker can entice you to a site containing maliciously crafted Flash content, he could exploit this flaw to execute any code with your privileges. If you are a local administrator, or have root access, the attacker gains complete control of your computer. The remaining flaws include three cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerabilities and two unspecified security bypass flaws.

Adobe rates these issues as a “Priority 1” issue for Windows and Mac, and recommend you apply the updates as soon as possible (within 72 hours).   However, the vulnerability technically affects other platforms as well, so I recommend you update any Flash capable device as soon as you can.

Solution Path

Adobe has released new versions of Flash Player (14.0.0.125 for computers) to fix these issues. If you allow Adobe Flash in your network, you should download and install the new versions immediately. If you’ve enabled Flash Player’s recent “silent update” option, you will receive this update automatically.

  • Download Flash Player for your computer:
NOTE: Chrome and newer versions of IE ship with their own versions of Flash, built-in. If you use them as you web browser, you will also have to update them separately, though both often receive their updates automatically.

For All WatchGuard Users:

If you choose, you can configure the HTTP proxy on your XTM appliance to block Flash content. Keep in mind, doing so blocks all Flash content, whether legitimate or malicious.

More importantly, WatchGuard’s Gateway Antivirus and Intrusion Prevention services can often prevent these sorts of attacks, or the malware they try to distribute. For instance, our IPS signature team has already developed a signature that can detect and block one of the Flash flaws:

  • EXPLOIT Adobe Flash Player security bypass vulnerability (CVE-2014-0520)

Your XTM appliance should get this new IPS signature update shortly.

Finally, our Reputation Enabled Defense (RED) and WebBlocker services can often prevent your users from accidentally visiting malicious (or legitimate but booby-trapped) web sites that contain these sorts of attacks. Nonetheless, we still recommend you install Adobe’s Flash update to completely protect yourself from all of these flaws.

Status:

Adobe has released updates to fix these Flash vulnerabilities.

References:

This alert was researched and written by Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept)

Adobe Patch Day: Reader, Flash, and Illustrator Security Patches

Severity: High

Summary:

  • These vulnerabilities affect: Reader and Acrobat, Flash Player, and Illustrator (CS6)
  • How an attacker exploits them: Multiple vectors of attack, including enticing your users to open malicious files or visit specially crafted web sites
  • Impact: Various results; in the worst case, an attacker can gain complete control of your computer
  • What to do: Install the appropriate Adobe patches immediately, or let Adobe’s updater do it for you.

Exposure:

Today, Adobe released or updated three security bulletins that describe vulnerabilities in four of their popular software packages; Reader and Acrobat X, Flash Player, and Illustrator.

Adobe Patch Day, May 2014

 

A remote attacker could exploit the worst of these flaws to gain complete control of your computer. We summarize the Adobe security bulletins below:

  • APSB14-15: Multiple Reader and Acrobat Code Execution Vulnerabilities

Adobe Reader helps you view PDF documents, while Acrobat helps you create them. Since PDF documents are very popular, most users install Reader to handle them.

Adobe’s bulletin describes 11 vulnerabilities that affect Adobe Reader and Acrobat XI 11.0.06 and earlier, running on Windows and Macintosh.  Adobe only describes the flaws in minimal technical detail, but they do share that many of the flaws involve memory corruption issues that attackers could exploit to execute code. Most of these memory corruption flaws share the same scope and impact. If an attacker can entice one of your users into opening a specially crafted PDF file, he can exploit these issues to execute code on that user’s computer, inheriting the user’s privileges. If your users have root or system administrator privileges, the attacker gains complete control of their computer. If you use Reader, you should patch soon.

Adobe Priority Rating: 1 (Patch within 72 hours)

  • APSB14-14: Half a Dozen Flash Player (and Air) Vulnerabilities

Adobe Flash Player displays interactive, animated web content called Flash. Although Flash is optional, 99% of PC users download and install it to view multimedia web content. It runs on many operating systems, including mobile operating systems like Android. It is also built into certain browsers, like Google and Internet Explorer (IE) 11.

Adobe’s bulletin describes six flaws in Flash Player 13.0.0.206 and earlier for all platforms. The vulnerabilities differ technically, and in scope and impact, but the worst could allow attackers to execute code on your users computers. Specifically, Flash Player suffers from a “use after free” vulnerability – a type of memory corruption flaw that attackers can leverage to execute arbitrary code. If an attacker can lure you to a web site, or get you to open documents containing specially crafted Flash content, he could exploit this flaw to execute code on your computer, with your privileges. If you have administrative or root privileges, the attacker could gain full control of your computer. Though not as severe as the use after free flaw, the remaining flaws are all security bypass issues that could also help attackers further elevate their privileges after an attack.

Adobe Priority Rating: 1 (Patch within 72 hours)

  • APSB14-011: Illustrator (CS6) Buffer Overflow Vulnerability

Illustrator is a very popular vector drawing program that ships with Adobe’s popular Creative Suite. It suffers from an unspecified buffer overflow vulnerability. Adobe doesn’t describe the flaw in technical detail, but we presume that it has something to do with handling specially crafted Illustrator files. If that’s the case, opening specially crafted files in Illustrator could allow attackers to execute code on your machine with your privileges. Attackers don’t often target Illustrator, so we don’t expect this vulnerability to get exploited much in the wild. Nonetheless, if you use Illustrator, you ought to patch it at your convenience.

Adobe Priority Rating: 3 (Patch at your discretion)

Solution Path:

Adobe has released updates for all their affected software. If you use any of the software below, we recommend you download and deploy the corresponding updates as soon as possible, or let Adobe’s automatic updater do it for you.

For All WatchGuard Users:

Attackers can exploit these flaws using diverse exploitation methods. Installing Adobe’s updates is your most secure course of action.

Status:

Adobe has released patches correcting these issues.

References:

    • Adobe Reader/Acrobat Security Update APSB14-15
    • Adobe Flash Player Security Update APSB14-14
    • Adobe Illustrator Security Update APSB14-11

This alert was researched and written by Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept).

Latest Flash Update Mends Four Flaws

Summary:

  • This vulnerability affects: Adobe Flash Player running on all platforms and Adobe Air
  • How an attacker exploits it: By enticing users to visit a website containing malicious Flash content
  • Impact: In the worst case, an attacker can execute code on the user’s computer, potentially gaining control of it
  • What to do: Download and install the latest version of Adobe Flash Player for your platform

Exposure:

Adobe Flash Player displays interactive, animated web content called Flash. Although Flash is optional, 99% of PC users download and install it to view multimedia web content. It runs on many operating systems, including mobile operating systems like Android.

This week, Adobe released a security bulletin describing four security vulnerabilities (based on CVE numbers) that affect Flash Player running on any platform. It doesn’t describe the flaws in much technical detail, other than saying they consist mostly of buffer overflow vulnerabilities and other types of memory corruption flaws (and a cross-site scripting issue). That said, Adobe does warn that if an attacker can entice one of your users to visit a malicious website containing specially crafted Flash content, he could exploit many of these unspecified vulnerabilities to execute code on that user’s computer, with that user’s privileges. If your Windows users have local administrator privileges, an attacker could exploit this flaw to gain full control of their PCs.

Though it doesn’t look like attackers are exploiting these flaws in the wild yet, Adobe rates the flaws as a “Priority 1” issues for Windows and Macintosh users, and recommends you apply the updates within 72 hours. These vulnerabilities also affect other platforms as well, such as Internet Explorer (IE) 11 and Chrome. I recommend you update any Flash capable platform as soon as you can.

Solution Path

Adobe has released new versions of Flash Player to fix these issues. If you allow Adobe Flash in your network, you should download and install the new versions immediately. If you’ve enabled Flash Player’s recent “silent update” option, you will receive this update automatically.

You can download Flash for your computer at the link provided below. See the bulletin’s “Affected Software” section for more details on getting Flash updates for other platforms:

Keep in mind, if you use Google Chrome or IE 11, you’ll have to update it seperately.

For All WatchGuard Users:

Good News! WatchGuard’s Gateway Antivirus and Intrusion Prevention services can often prevent these sorts of attacks, or the malware they try to distribute. For instance, our IPS signature team has developed signatures that can detect and block many of the memory corruption vulnerabilities described in Adobe’s alert:

  • WEB  Adobe Flash Player High Surrogate Parsing Cross Site Scripting  (CVE-2014-0509)
  • WEB-CLIENT Adobe Flash Player Information Disclosure (CVE-2014-0508)
  • EXPLOIT Adobe Flash Player Memory Corruption (CVE-2014-0506)
  • EXPLOIT Adobe Flash Player Memory Corruption (CVE-2014-0507)

Your XTM appliance should get this new IPS update shortly.

Furthermore, our Reputation Enabled Defense (RED) and WebBlocker services can often prevent your users from accidentally visiting malicious (or legitimate but booby-trapped) web sites that contain these sorts of attacks. Nonetheless, we still recommend you install Adobe’s Flash update to completely protect yourself from all of these flaws.

Status:

Adobe has released updates to fix these Flash vulnerabilities.

References:

This alert was researched and written by Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept)

Out-of-Cycle Word FixIt Corrects Zero Day Vulnerability

If you’re worried about spear phishing attacks (and if you’re not, you should be), grab Microsoft’s emergency FixIt to mitigate a zero day vulnerability attackers are exploiting in the wild.

In a security advisory released yesterday, Microsoft warned of a zero day vulnerability in Word, which attackers are exploiting in what Microsoft describes as limited, targeted attacks. Apparently, the exploit in the wild targets Word 2010, but the flaw affects other versions of Word as well. Since this is an early advisory, it doesn’t describe the flaw in much technical detail. However, it does mention attackers can trigger the flaw with specially crafted rich text format (RTF) files. If an attacker can entice you to view a malicious RTF in Word, he could exploit this vulnerability to execute code on you computer, with your privileges. If you are an administrator, the attacker gains complete control of your PC.

By default, most current version of Office use Word as Outlook’s email viewer. This mean attackers can trigger this flaw just by getting you to open an RTF attached to an email. According to some on Twitter, simply previewing an email with a malicious RTF triggers the flaw.

While Microsoft hasn’t had time to release a full patch yet, they have posted a FixIt that mitigates the risk of this vulnerability. If you use Office, I highly recommend you install the FixIt as soon as you can. Also, Microsoft’s Enhanced Mitigation Experience Toolkit (EMET) can mitigate the risk of any type of memory corruption flaw. In general, I recommend you install EMET on Windows machines to protect them from any zero day, memory-related issues.

I’ll post more details about this flaw during an upcoming Patch Day, when Microsoft releases the final update. In the meantime, if you’d like more information about it you can check out Microsoft’s security blog post— Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept

 

Shockwave Update Misses Adobe Patch Day

A few days ago, I posted an alert mentioning how Adobe Patch Day was particularly light, and pointing out the one minor Flash Player update. Turns out Adobe had other updates in store for us, they just missed their self-appointed patch day.

Today, Adobe released a Shockwave Player update fixing a single critical Shockwave Player vulnerability. They share almost no technical detail about the flaw, other than it is a memory corruption issue that remote attackers could leverage to execute code on a victim’s computer; presumably by getting them to view or interact with malicious Shockwave content. Though it doesn’t look like attackers are exploiting it in the wild yet, this flaw is quite a bit more severe than the Flash flaws mentioned earlier in the week. Nonetheless, Adobe only assigns them a priority (severity) rating of 2, which means you should update in the next 30 days. I think this is a slightly bigger deal than that, and recommend you update Shockwave as soon as you can. If you are using Adobe’s automatic updater, it should be relatively easy to do so.  — Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept

Adobe Patch Day Consists of Minor Flash Update

Adobe shares Microsoft’s Patch Day, and they usually release a handful of security updates themselves. However, this month they’ve kept it pretty simple, with only one relatively minor update for their Flash Player.

According to their bulletin, the latest Flash update fixes two security flaws in their popular web-based media player. Adobe is never one to share much detail about their vulnerabilities, but they do share the impact of each of these flaws.  They mention one of the flaws allows attackers to bypass the same origin policy, while the other allows attackers to read the contents of your computer’s clipboard. Compared to Adobe’s recent emergency Flash patch, which fixed a zero day issue exploited in the wild, these issues are not very severe. In fact, Adobe only assigns them a priority (severity) rating of 2, which means you should think about updating in the next 30 days.

Nonetheless, it doesn’t hurt to update your client computers, and Adobe’s automatic updater should make it pretty easy. If you aren’t already letting Adobe get it’s automatic updates, at least on client machines, I recommend you do so. — Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept

0day Watering Holes – WSWiR Episode 96

Flash and IE 0day, Watering Holes, and Router Worms

It’s Friday, Friday, gotta get your InfoSec on Friday….

Seriously though. If you are looking for a quick round-up of this week’s biggest security news, this is your show. In it, I cover what I think are the top three information and network security stories of the week, vlog style. If that sounds good, keep reading.

This week’s episode covers an advanced watering hole attack that leverages two zero day vulnerabilities, a worm that’s infecting a popular brand consumer router, and new vulnerabilities that affect devices which fall under “the Internet of things” category. If you’d like all the details, including how to protect yourself, watch the video below. Or if you prefer to read, check out the Reference section for links to those stories and more.

Quick show note. Next week I’ll be attending the annual RSA Security Conference. Though I still hope to produce a video on the road, I may have to settle for a text version of our weekly Infosec news if I get too busy. Keep an eye on the blog for the latest, and have a great weekend.

(Episode Runtime: 8:57)

Direct YouTube Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NbxXXLov6Ek

Episode References:

Extras:

— Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept)

Grab Adobe and Microsoft’s Emergency Flash and IE Fixes

Let’s start with the short version. Yesterday, both Microsoft and Adobe released out-of-cycle updates to fix zero day security vulnerabilities that advanced attackers are exploiting in the wild via “watering hole” campaigns. If you use these products and haven’t installed the updates, go get the Flash and Internet Explorer (IE) fixes now!

The slightly longer story is early this week (during the U.S. President’s Day holiday) two security companies, FireEye and Websense, independently reported discovering two different legitimate web sites serving malware via a drive-by download attack. The web sites included a U.S Veteran’s site (VFW.org) and a French aeronautical company’s web site. The malicious code on these sites exploited two previously undiscovered, zero day vulnerabilities affecting Adobe Flash, and IE 9 and 10. They also delivered some relatively advanced trojan malware (in one case, Gh0strat), which has been used before in attacks that seem to come from China-based hackers. Since these sites have very specific user bases (military and ex-military, or aeronautical engineers), these attack campaigns fall into the category of watering hole attacks, where smart attackers purposely hijack web sites they know their target visits in hopes of poisoning the target’s watering hole. If you’d like to learn more about these types of attacks, and other web threats, you can check out a presentation I recently gave on the subject in a BrightTALK. You can also learn more about these specific attacks in this week’s upcoming security video.

In any case, yesterday both Microsoft and Adobe released advisories that include updates or FixIts that patch these zero day flaws. While you probably haven’t run into these exploits yet, unless you happen to fall into the two victim bases for these attacks, I expect criminal attackers to quickly start leveraging these new flaws. Now that they are public, you can expect criminal hackers to quickly incorporate the new attacks into the exploit kits they sell on the underground. Once they do, you’ll start to see these exploits popping up every where, to serve normal criminal malware. In other words, if you use IE or Flash, you should go get the updates immediately. You can find links to them in Microsoft and Adobe’s advisories. — Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept

 

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